SHIFTING SANDS OF THE OPEN DESERT


A Palestinian youth rolls a tire toward a burning barricade during clashes with Israeli soldiers following a protest against plans to build new Jewish settlements, near Nablus. [Nedal Eshtayah/Getty Images]

A Palestinian youth rolls a tire toward a burning barricade during clashes with Israeli soldiers following a protest against plans to build new Jewish settlements, near Nablus. [Nedal Eshtayah/Getty Images]

tagged as → #palestine #israel #west bank #nablus

A senior UN official has confirmed that the Israeli military turned a school in the Gaza Strip into a military base during July’s ground offensive.

The comments last week by Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict Leila Zerrougui corroborate a report that was published in The Times on August 5 (‘Invaders turn abandoned school into command base’).

Addressing a Security Council debate on children and armed conflict, Zerrougui said 244 schools, including 75 UNRWA schools, “were shelled by Israel’s armed forces”, adding that “one school was used as a military base by the IDF.” Although she did not name the school, it has been confirmed to me this was a reference to Hani Naim Agriculture Secondary School for Boys in Beit Hanoun.

The piece in The Times which appeared early August describes in detail the scene after the soldiers had left, when residents discovered that in the past four weeks the school had been turned into a command centre for the Israeli army.

"Dozens of grenade shells and bullet casings were scattered amid brick dust and rubbish under desks pushed up against a window. Spent ammunition littering the classroom floors told of the ferocity of the battles waged from there…The shells found scattered in classrooms were for launchers that could fire 300 grenades per minute. The casings were from a machinegun that can cut through a house. The remains of what looked like a 155mm Howitzer artillery shell was left in the playground."

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They would pick on the men at random and make them crawl on the floor. If they thought they crawled well, they assumed it was due to some sort of military training, so they took them behind a sand bank and killed them."
Siham Balqis, a witness of the massacre in Shatila refugee camp (via lastuli)

The Sabra and Shatila massacre took place in the Sabra and Shatila Palestinian refugee camps in Beirut, Lebanon, between September 16 and September 18, 1982, during the Lebanese civil war.
Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were massacred in the camps by the Israeli supporters Phalangist militia while the camp was surrounded by Israeli forces.

In that period of time, Israel was at war with Lebanon. The Israeli forces occupied Beirut and dominated militarily the refugee camps of Palestinians and controlled the entrance to the city. Later, the Israeli forces were ruled to have been involved directly in massacres carried out in both camps.

The Sabra and Shatila massacre took place in the Sabra and Shatila Palestinian refugee camps in Beirut, Lebanon, between September 16 and September 18, 1982, during the Lebanese civil war.

Palestinian and Lebanese civilians were massacred in the camps by the Israeli supporters Phalangist militia while the camp was surrounded by Israeli forces.

In that period of time, Israel was at war with Lebanon. The Israeli forces occupied Beirut and dominated militarily the refugee camps of Palestinians and controlled the entrance to the city. Later, the Israeli forces were ruled to have been involved directly in massacres carried out in both camps.

Israel’s Civil Administration in the West Bank is advancing a plan to expel thousands of Bedouin from lands east of Jerusalem and forcibly relocate them to a new town in the Jordan Valley.

Between late August and last week, the administration published nine plans that together comprise the master plan for the proposed new town north of Jericho. The plans were drafted without consulting the Bedouin slated to live there, in violation of the Supreme Court’s recommendation.

In explanatory notes to the plans, to which the public now has 60 days to submit objections, the administration said its proposal suits the “dynamic changes” Bedouin society is undergoing as it moves from an agricultural society to “a modern society that earns its living by commerce, services, technical trades and more.”

The town is slated for about 12,500 Bedouin from the Jahalin, Kaabneh and Rashaida tribes. It is the third and largest of the towns the administration has designated for Bedouin in the West Bank.

Concentrating the Bedouin into a few permanent towns represents the culmination of a 40-year process of limiting their pasturage, restricting their migrations and refusing to let them build permanent homes in places where they have lived for decades. This process accelerated after the Oslo Accords were signed in 1993.


A man with his son walk past a newly painted mural of a former South Yemen flag painted by Yemeni supporters of the Southern Separatist Movement (‘Al Hirak’) in the southern Yemeni port city of Aden. [Sinan Yiter/Getty Images]

A man with his son walk past a newly painted mural of a former South Yemen flag painted by Yemeni supporters of the Southern Separatist Movement (‘Al Hirak’) in the southern Yemeni port city of Aden. [Sinan Yiter/Getty Images]

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tagged as → #yemen #south yemen #independence #dpry

Palestinian bagpipers back Scottish independence
Scottish independence campaigners have found an unexpected source of support ahead of a landmark referendum on the fate of the United Kingdom — Palestinian bagpipers.
In a small hall in the occupied West Bank, far from the tussle over Scotland’s future, pipers and stick-twirling drummers burst into action as local scout troop members march up and down for weekly practice.
The deafening display appears more like the kind of spectacle seen on the streets of Edinburgh than in the predominantly Christian town of Beit Jala.
But the scouts insist the bagpipes’ Scottish heritage translates perfectly to the Palestinian struggle for their own independence.

Palestinian bagpipers back Scottish independence

Scottish independence campaigners have found an unexpected source of support ahead of a landmark referendum on the fate of the United Kingdom — Palestinian bagpipers.

In a small hall in the occupied West Bank, far from the tussle over Scotland’s future, pipers and stick-twirling drummers burst into action as local scout troop members march up and down for weekly practice.

The deafening display appears more like the kind of spectacle seen on the streets of Edinburgh than in the predominantly Christian town of Beit Jala.

But the scouts insist the bagpipes’ Scottish heritage translates perfectly to the Palestinian struggle for their own independence.

They talk about the failure of socialism. Where is the success of capitalism?"
Fidel Castro, after the fall of the USSR (via castroistvaporwave)

The Illuminator projected this near the Brooklyn Bridge in solidarity with the people of Ferguson.


Palestinian girls undergoing training in the Marka Refugee Camp in Jordan, 1970. [Jeff Blankfort]

Palestinian girls undergoing training in the Marka Refugee Camp in Jordan, 1970. [Jeff Blankfort]

(Source: jeffblankfortphotography.com)

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Palestinian boys, from age 13-17, are frequently arrested by the IDF. Military Court Watch, an Israeli NGO, has found that 50 percent of these children are arrested in night raids, and that 80 percent are blindfolded.

To the military violence, we must add the fact that Palestinians are regularly exposed to acts of violence by civilians. The settlers known as “hilltop youth” and “price tag” attacks aim to hurt Palestinians in various ways, in their lands, property or body. These acts are only sporadically prosecuted by Israel, and when they are, more often than not it ends with no conviction.

Indeed, Palestinians are subject to a legal system that is different from the one in Israel. As the Calcalist blogger Yossi Gurvitz writes: “Residents of one street in Hebron are judged according to one legal system, and residents [of a] nearby street under a different legal system. If a Palestinian child is suspected of throwing stones at soldiers, IDF gunmen break into his home at night, take him, blindfolded, to interrogation, accompanied by torture at times, and he will be put in custody. If a settler is suspected of throwing a stone at a soldier, it is likely nothing will happen to him. Naturally, no one would think of breaking into his house during the night

"
Eva Illouz (via idemandliberation)

(Source: momo33me)

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Photo series from collective ActiveStills, attempting to tell some of the individual stories of Palestinians in Gaza, and highlight the extraordinary solidarity and unsung heroism which was shown in so many ways during the 51 days of bombing and terror.

The stories behind the photos

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The Land Speaks Arabic, directed by Maryse Gargour, combines very rare pre-48 footage of Palestine, newsreels, historical documents, and testimonials to paint a picture of the Zionist colonization project.

Letters in European languages exchanged between European Zionists and European imperialists are read followed by scenes of the impact of these blueprints of social engineering. Articles from newspapers of the late 19th century and early 20th century report on the progress (a poor choice of word in this context) of the colonisation project. We see through documents, including news reports and letters, that the word colonisation was used by the Zionist colonizers, when their writings and their speeches expressed the ideas of replacing the natives with the new population from Europe.

(Source: poppoppopblowblowbubblegum)

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you know that feeling when nothing’s wrong but nothing’s right either

(Source: ombrume)


Separatist graffiti in Aden, South Yemen.

Separatist graffiti in Aden, South Yemen.

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tagged as → #yemen #south yemen #independence #aden #dpry