SHIFTING SANDS OF THE OPEN DESERT

Palestinian filmmaker Elia Suleiman pole-vaulting over the Israeli “security wall” in The Time That Remains (2009).

(Source: mizoguchi)

The rage of the oppressed is never the same as the rage of the privileged."

Bell Hooks

(Source: esteemsters)

(Source: leftieskerthings)

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On his first visit to Gaza, Pierre Krahenbuhl says Israel is imposing collective punishment on Palestinians in the strip and that their seven-year blockade of the Gaza Strip is the “longest in history”.

Speaking at a conference in the southern Gaza town of Khan Younis on Wednesday, Krahenbuhl said that the blockade was being used to collectively punish the Palestinian people – an issue that would be the focal point of his future discussions in the region.

During his first visit to Gaza, Krahenbuhl urged world leaders to help the Palestinians end the Israeli blockade, which was imposed on Gaza soon after the Hamas Islamic Movement seized control of the enclave in 2007.

"It is clear that this amounts to a very extreme form and illegal collective punishment that will be also at the heart of all of the advocacy work that UNRWA carries out," Krahenbuhl said.

He added that the deteriorating humanitarian conditions in the Palestinian enclave were clearly apparent. Krahenbuhl added that he would brief Israeli officials on conditions in Gaza, noting that the UNRWA was determined to find a solution to the crisis.

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Lydda Death March (Nakba 1948)

The “Lydda Death March” of 1948 when the Palestinian inhabitants of Al Lydd were forced to march in the searing hot summer sun at gunpoint by the Zionists into exile with nothing more than the clothes on their backs, and where many of the children and the elderly perished.

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A large explosion in Barzeh, Syria, during fighting between government forces and opposition fighters.

A large explosion in Barzeh, Syria, during fighting between government forces and opposition fighters.

Anonymous asked: Why drones in Yemen???

The US sends drones to Yemen to kill “suspected” Al Qaeda militants. If you know anything about Yemen is that half the civilian population own a gun, and any adult male is considered a suspected militant by the US, so you end up murdering a lot of innocent people and anyone who was unlucky enough to be standing next to them including children. 

There’s also the fact that the US has very little knowledge of whoever it is targeting, their intelligence on Yemen is incredibly poor and more often than not it is duped by the Yemeni government into murdering their political opponents. 

That being said Al Qaeda in Yemen is dangerous and vile and I would not be sad to see them go, but the tactics employed by the Yemeni government and the US won’t work. Murdering innocent civilians via drones will only drive more people to terrorism.

tagged as → #Anonymous #yemen #drones

Poverty tourism is only the most recent form of the evolution of the particular fascination (stand well back, but let us peer at you, curiously) that the upper classes have with the lower. The current mutation of poverty tourism includes a well meaning, upper/middle class, first world people, who are for whatever reason turned onto going to Africa (and it’s always Africa, isn’t it) to learn about how the starving children that show up on their TVs and their destitute parents live.
From Kennedy Odede, a Kenyan university student:
“Slum tourism has its advocates, who say it promotes social awareness. And it’s good money, which helps the local economy. 
 But it’s not worth it. Slum tourism turns poverty into entertainment, something that can be momentarily experienced and then escaped from. People think they’ve really “seen” something — and then go back to their lives and leave me, my family and my community right where we were before”

Poverty tourism is only the most recent form of the evolution of the particular fascination (stand well back, but let us peer at you, curiously) that the upper classes have with the lower. The current mutation of poverty tourism includes a well meaning, upper/middle class, first world people, who are for whatever reason turned onto going to Africa (and it’s always Africa, isn’t it) to learn about how the starving children that show up on their TVs and their destitute parents live.

From Kennedy Odede, a Kenyan university student:

“Slum tourism has its advocates, who say it promotes social awareness. And it’s good money, which helps the local economy.

But it’s not worth it. Slum tourism turns poverty into entertainment, something that can be momentarily experienced and then escaped from. People think they’ve really “seen” something — and then go back to their lives and leave me, my family and my community right where we were before”

Reblog - Posted 7 hours ago - via / Source with 26 notes

Sanaa, Yemen: People chant slogans against U.S. drone strikes outside the Yemeni House of Representatives, April 24, 2014. At least 70 people are reported killed in the past week.

Sanaa, Yemen: People chant slogans against U.S. drone strikes outside the Yemeni House of Representatives, April 24, 2014. At least 70 people are reported killed in the past week.

Reblog - Posted 7 hours ago - via / Source with 49 notes

In besieged Gaza, Palestinian unity deal sparks hope, caution
GAZA — Shock, disbelief, elation and a surge of giddy optimism were among the reactions of Gazans to Wednesday’s news that Fatah and Hamas had agreed to form a unity government that, if implemented, would end the seven-year schism that separated Gaza from the West Bank. An Israeli airstrike on the besieged enclave the same day, however, served as a reminder of the scale of the challenges that lie ahead.
Crowds of people gathered to celebrate outside Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh’s house in the Al-Shati refugee camp, known as Beach Camp. (More than two-thirds of Gaza’s population consists of families of refugees who lost their homes inside what is now Israel when it was created in 1948.) As the sun set along the Gazan coast, fishermen returning to port were greeted by a bustle of celebration, as refugee children played on the sand and crowded around Palestinian television news network vans parked on the crowded street outside the refugee camp.
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In besieged Gaza, Palestinian unity deal sparks hope, caution

GAZA — Shock, disbelief, elation and a surge of giddy optimism were among the reactions of Gazans to Wednesday’s news that Fatah and Hamas had agreed to form a unity government that, if implemented, would end the seven-year schism that separated Gaza from the West Bank. An Israeli airstrike on the besieged enclave the same day, however, served as a reminder of the scale of the challenges that lie ahead.

Crowds of people gathered to celebrate outside Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh’s house in the Al-Shati refugee camp, known as Beach Camp. (More than two-thirds of Gaza’s population consists of families of refugees who lost their homes inside what is now Israel when it was created in 1948.) As the sun set along the Gazan coast, fishermen returning to port were greeted by a bustle of celebration, as refugee children played on the sand and crowded around Palestinian television news network vans parked on the crowded street outside the refugee camp.

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A person who uses force is afraid of reason"

Kenyan Proverb

(Source: classicethnichistoricalvibez)


A Bahraini girl shows her hands knotted with a writing reading in Arabic “No to dictatorship” during a pro-democracy rally in the village of Diraz, west of Manama. (Photo: AFP - Mohammed al-Shaikh)

A Bahraini girl shows her hands knotted with a writing reading in Arabic “No to dictatorship” during a pro-democracy rally in the village of Diraz, west of Manama. (Photo: AFP - Mohammed al-Shaikh)